Homeostasis of the body

To identify the process by which body systems are kept within certain limits.

Homeostasis of the body

When such a system is disturbed, built-in regulatory devices respond to the departures to establish a new balance; such a process is one of feedback control.

All processes of integration and coordination of function, whether mediated by electrical circuits or by nervous and hormonal systems, are examples of homeostatic regulation. A familiar example of homeostatic regulation in a mechanical system is the action of a room- temperature regulator, or thermostat.

The heart of the thermostat is a bimetallic strip that responds to temperature changes by completing or disrupting an electric circuit. When the room cools, the circuit is completed, the furnace operates, and the temperature rises.

At a preset level the circuit breaks, the furnace stops, and the temperature drops. Biological systems, of greater complexity, however, have regulators only very roughly comparable to such mechanical devices.

The two types of systems are alike, however, in their goals—to sustain activity within prescribed ranges, whether to control the thickness of rolled steel or the pressure within the circulatory system. The control of body temperature in humans is a good example of homeostasis in a biological system.

Feedback about body temperature is carried through the bloodstream to the brain and results in compensatory adjustments in the breathing rate, the level of blood sugarand the metabolic rate.

Heat loss in humans is aided by reduction of activity, by perspirationand by heat-exchange mechanisms that permit larger amounts of blood to circulate near the skin surface. Heat loss is reduced by insulation, decreased circulation to the skin, and cultural modification such as the use of clothing, shelter, and external heat sources.

As either of the two extremes is approached, corrective action through negative feedback returns the system to the normal range. The concept of homeostasis has also been applied to ecological settings.

Homeostasis of the body

First proposed by Canadian-born American ecologist Robert MacArthur inhomeostasis in ecosystems is a product of the combination of biodiversity and large numbers of ecological interactions that occur between species.

The Gaia Hypothesis —the model of Earth posited by English scientist James Lovelock that considers its various living and nonliving parts as components of a larger system or single organism—makes the assumption that the collective effort of individual organisms contributes to homeostasis at the planetary level.The maintenance of a steady body temperature in warm-blooded animals is an example of homeostasis.

In human beings, the homeostatic regulation of body temperature involves such mechanisms as sweating when the internal temperature becomes excessive and shivering to produce heat, as well as the generation of heat through metabolic processes when.

Homeostasis and Regulation in the Human Body ‹ OpenCurriculum

Feb 10,  · Homeostasis is the characteristic of an organism to regulate its internal conditions. An example is the body regulating its internal temperature by shivering or sweating.

Homeostasis has found useful applications in the social sciences. It refers to how a person under conflicting stresses and motivations can maintain a stable psychological condition. Homeostasis is a key concept in understanding how our body works. It means keeping things constant and comes from two Greek words: 'homeo,' meaning 'similar,' and 'stasis,' meaning 'stable.'.

The organism or cell maintains homeostasis by monitoring its internal conditions and responding appropriately when these conditions deviate from their optimal state. The maintenance of a steady body temperature in warm-blooded animals is an example of homeostasis.

Homeostasis refers to stability, balance, or equilibrium within a cell or the body. It is an organism’s ability to keep a constant internal environment.

Feb 10,  · Homeostasis is the characteristic of an organism to regulate its internal conditions. An example is the body regulating its internal temperature by shivering or sweating. The organism or cell maintains homeostasis by monitoring its internal conditions and responding appropriately when these conditions deviate from their optimal state. The maintenance of a steady body temperature in warm-blooded animals is an example of homeostasis. Homeostasis is an almost exclusively biological term, referring to the concepts described by Bernard and Cannon, concerning the constancy of the internal environment in which the cells of .

It is an organism’s ability to keep a .

Homeostasis and Regulation in the Human Body ‹ OpenCurriculum