Truck speed limiter mandate

Testimonials Speed Limiters Speed limiters, also described as speed governors, are devices that interact with a truck engine to permit the attainment of a pre-programmed maximum speed. Speed limiters are electronic controlled modules ECM that are capable of limiting the maximum speed.

Truck speed limiter mandate

Testimonials Speed Limiters Speed limiters, also described as speed governors, are devices that interact with a truck engine to permit the attainment of a pre-programmed maximum speed.

Speed limiters are electronic controlled modules ECM that are capable of limiting the maximum speed. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, safety groups, and large carriers have been pushing for a speed limiter mandate on commercial motor vehicle for years because of proposed safety benefits.

The two reports are almost identical, except for a few omissions and rephrasing of words. All of the research and data remained the same, but the interpretation was changed from, the data did not support speed limiters, to "The findings showed strong positive benefits for SLs speed limiters.

FMCSA, safety groups, and large carriers often proclaim the so-called safety benefits of speed limiters, but yet they refuse to look at the real-world facts, even in their own study.

OOIDA is opposed to a mandate for speed limiters, as mandating speed limiters would decrease overall highway safety because the interaction between large trucks and passenger vehicles would increase. It is important to note that there is no clear evidence that supports that the use of speed limiters will improve safety.

In fact, there is data that states that high-speed related truck crashes are rare events and the reduction of speed and power can have negative effects on safety. Studies have demonstrated that a higher variance of vehicle speeds in traffic flow increases the risk of an accident, and speed limiters cause speed variance.

Regardless of the average speed on the highway, the greater a driver deviates from the average speed, the greater his chances of being involved in an accident. Low speed drivers are more likely to be involved in accidents than high-speed drivers are.

In 80 percent of rear-end collisions involving a large truck and a car resulting in a fatality, the passenger vehicle rear-ended the truck. Furthermore, a reduction in speed will cause more congestion. Other vehicles will have to decelerate and then accelerate to maneuver around the slower traffic; this will increase fuel consumption and increase safety concerns.

In addition to decreased safety concerns, many argue that a speed limiter mandate would not address one of the top causes of large truck crashes, traveling too fast for conditions. While it is true that speed is a factor in some crashes, it is mixed in terms of the relationships of speed to the speed limits.

Truck speed limiter mandate

The data showing crashes that occur when the vehicle was traveling above the speed limit is minor compared to the case of traveling too fast for conditions. The core issue appears to be crash risk relating to speed limit compliance versus absolute speed. For instance, a NHTSA study found that a much higher percentage of drivers involved in crashes were exceeding a reasonable safe speed In addition to the safety concerns that speed limiters will impose, there is also profit loss to consider for the small owner-operators.

Driving 65 mph instead of the maximum 70 mph or above that is allowed in 26 states would cost drivers miles a day.

When will the Speed Limiter Rule go into Force?

The vast majority said that uniform speed limits were the best way to regulate speeding of large trucks. Vehicles traveling at different speeds are dangerous, and increase the risk of a crash. Instead of a speed limiter mandate to prevent speeding, carriers could modify the fundamental and structural problems that create incentives for speeding, such as compensation of drivers by mile and lack of pay for substantial amounts of time spent waiting to load and unload.

Speeding is often a function of the economics of trucking. The perceived need to speed will be eliminated if carriers pay per hour, pay bonuses, or increase per mile pay for compliant driving.

OOIDA obviously does not condone speeding or other unsafe driving habits. This would improve the quality of commercial truck drivers and keep unsafe and unprepared drivers off the road.Oppose the Proposed Truck Speed Limiter Mandate According to the DOT proposal, truck speed limiters would be required on any commercial truck with a gross weight of 26, pounds or more.

Maximum speeds of 60, 65 and 68 mph have been suggested yet feedback and data are still needed before a final speed can be determined. US proposal to limit truck speeds would cut capacity If you have an existing account please login below to read this article, otherwise you can register for free to view up to five articles every thirty days.

Speed limiter technology works with a truck engine’s electronic control module to govern how fast the vehicle can travel. But older trucks don’t have the electronic controls.

A speed limiter mandate could actually be an impediment to new technology that may enhance road safety. Lastly, we believe the proposal lacks hard data.

Throughout the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) there is a use of estimates, references to undefined “common sense” approaches, and general assumptions due to lack of empirical data.

The Department of Transportation (DOT) is about to mandate the use of speed limiters – also known as Electronic Control Modules (ECM) – on certain trucks traveling U.S. highways. Oppose the Proposed Truck Speed Limiter Mandate According to the DOT proposal, truck speed limiters would be required on any commercial truck with a gross weight of 26, pounds or more.

Maximum speeds of 60, 65 and 68 mph have been suggested yet feedback and data are still needed before a final speed can be determined.

Report: US Speed Limiter Rule Among Mandates in Early - Ontario Trucking Association